Back to School: Blue Life Stewards

People ask, “Why do you give away your Blue Life Curriculum (grades 4-8) to teachers and students – no charge?”

Here’s one reason why: “In school, children learn to be citizens. As we face climate change, disparities between rich and poor, and complicated questions about ever-more-powerful technology, we need citizens who care about community and can speak different truths.”EnviroKidsGallery07-itok=ENKYip0m

The above is a quote from the book Family Business by Malinda Chouinard and Jennifer Ridgeway

There are children all over the world being given the valuable opportunity to practice journal writing. Our thought is this: If young people are given a chance to reflect on gratitude, creating an amazing day and writing their intention to make a “blue life – good for the ocean and environment” choice every day, they will learn to be aware and proactive citizens that can save our ocean.

The second part of the Blue Life Curriculum is a series of engaging slide decks including powerful video, scripted discussion cues for the teacher and digital worksheets (no paper needed).  These resources reinforce ideas, demonstrate the power of individuals to make a difference and are geared to inspire young people to innovate and invent.

That’s our donation to our future. CONTACT us for more information.

Humans vs Microplastics: Expeditions and Heroes

zane-mangroveEvery day we can find our Ocean Advocate and “Blue Life” heroes and heroines sharing their passion and stories online. Sometimes their adventures and journeys seem so large and amazing that we might sit back in awe – and wonder, “What could I possibly do to make in difference in a problem so huge as micro-plastics in the ocean?” (Meet Blue Life Journal co-author Zane Schweitzer making a personal difference each day – featured image)

For example, in collaboration with Parley and supported by TOMRA recycling, the pioneering all-female crew of “eXXpedition North Pacific” recently set sail from Honolulu, Hawaii, on a scientific research mission led by award-winning British skipper, Parley collaborator and ocean advocate, Emily Penn. The voyage will investigate solutions to the devastating impacts of plastic and related toxic pollutants in the world’s oceans, and bring global awareness to three “unseens”: women in science; pollution in our oceans and bodies; and rises in disease, especially in young women. Exxxpedition-north-pacific4

Here’s another recent example from 5 Gyres, their 18th Expedition bringing citizen scientists (including Blue Life Journal co-author Zane Schweitzer) through Indonesia’s Corla Triangle from Bali to Komodo. They sampled microplastics and explored solutions to the problem of plastic pollution. Groups were lead by 5 Gyres Co-Founder and Research Director Marcus Eriksen and 5 Gyres Science Programs Director Carolynn Box.

Through their Asia Pacific Action Against Plastic Pollution program, 5 Gyres is collaborating with NGOs in Southeast Asia to highlight and scale zero-waste efforts in the region. Data collected on this Expedition will be incorporated into their global dataset of microplastics, used in the update of 5 Gyres’ Global Estimate of Marine Plastic Pollution study.

That expedition exemplifies 5 Gyres’ “science to solutions” model, leading to a better understanding of the global scope and trends related to ocean plastic pollution. It will help us monitor the efficacy of upstream solutions over time. ( Learn more about the NIX 6 – what WE can do)

Upstream solutions – WE are the upstream. WE are the ones who can (one by one) turn off our personal “plastics into the ocean” tap. When the gushing stream of plastics into the water, land and air is so huge it might seems that turning off (or turning down) our own little tap is almost meaningless.

blj-new-bright-coverThis is absolutely NOT the case, and we all know it in our heart. We make a “blue life” choice and write about it in our Blue Life Journal. We share it on our social media, we talk about it in conversation with a friend, we turn down our tap.

More importantly, we connect with others who begin to do the same. We may not be on an expedition in Indonesia, we may not be measuring plastic across the oceans of the world – but we are leading change where it will matter most. Our personal habits and choices will turn off the taps where it is need most – UPSTREAM from the plastic garbage patches killing our oceans. (Get your Blue Life Journal and start today)

Never think your choices are less important – remember that collectively we created the problem as a human member of the plastics dilemma. Together, we are the ones who will solve it.

Our mantra we hope you adopt with us: ONE + TOGETHER = HOPE.

 

 

Solutions Inspire: Saving Our Ocean

food-waste.jpg_largeWe found this on Twitter posted by @UNEnvironment. (You can follow us @BlueLifeConnect)

Small changes at the grocery store, at the dinner table and on the way to the garbage can will make a huge difference – to the Ocean. The info-graphic to the left shows the simple ways how – and why. It’s all about paying attention, making the small habit changes we can, and doing that daily. That’s the premise of the BLUE LIFE JOURNAL.

Check the “use by” date and learn just how much longer that food item is actually safe to use – and will cooking extend the time

Shop local – Being a locavore is powerful. Locavores are people who eat only locally-grown produce and, when possible, rely on meat, eggs, and other food products from local sources. These food are fresher, don’t travel so far from farm to market (and need less preservatives) and are grown by your neighbors.

While plastic is what we worry about most – living in a landfill for almost eternity – we dispose of much that can be composted. Buy what you need and then learn how to turn the “waste” into something of value. The high desert earth where I try to grow things with a not-so-green thumb would benefit from enrichment. Compost is decomposed organic material, such as leaves, grass clippings, and kitchen waste. It provides many essential nutrients for plant growth and therefore is often used as fertilizer. But you don’t have to BUY fertilizer, if you create it yourself. Compost also improves soil structure so that soil can easily hold the correct amount of moisture, nutrients and air.

These surprising “Blue Life” choices begin at home – even you live nowhere near the Ocean. #BeatPollution with a “Blue” mindset. We would love to hear your ideas.